Before they were ghostsigns

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The Council for the Preservation of Rural England used to produce leaflets bewailing the despoiling of town and countryside by intrusive advertising. Though the photos they used were invariably black, white and fuzzy, they do show some of the ads in use at the time. These shots are from the 1947 booklet Posters And The Planning Act.

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Hey kids, now you know what to do with your vinyl when you get fed up with it:  Send it off to the front! Slacker Record Week (I kid you not) took place from October 28 to November 2nd 1918 in the US. Citizens collected unwanted discs and sent them to the forces. This poster was designed by Charles Buckles Falls, who was on the job for book donations too.

The Empire Marketing Board had a short life, from 1926 to 1933, but turned out some attractive and eclectic marketing materials in that time, including this set of erm… unusual product purchase exhortations. All were designed by FC (Frederick Charles) Herrick, also responsible for lots of lovely London Transport posters. Anyway, I’m off to buy some British West Indian arrowroot…

Ever wondered how those signs got there? If you’re in the US, they may have been put up by Sam W Hoke, long distance bill poster. Here he is, touting his remarkable services in the June 1900 issue of Profitable Advertising.